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This time there is a Barolo from Giuseppe Mascarello, a Noon Eclipse and a Torres Gran Corona.

Now we have various wines, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from California, a Barbaresco and a modern Ribera del Duero.

We are tasting Grand Siecle, Bricco del Drago, Ürziger Würzgarten and a fantastic sweet wine from Martinelli.

1967 Chateauneuf du Pape, 1947 Barolo and Chateau Troplong Mondot 1959 were donated by a friend.

Two German Riesling wines, an awesome Chateau Climens and a perfect Barolo from 1971 were the basis for a long evening.

In a blind tasting it is sometimes difficult to distinguish a Nebbiolo from a Sangiovese. Traditional Sangiovese also have a lot of tannins, but usually a little more acidity.

This was an evening of great wines.

La Spinetta is one of the best Barbaresco producers. Here we have two different Barbaresco vineyards, but the vintage makes a much bigger difference. Therefore, the difference between a classic vintage (1999) and a hot vintage (1997) can be observed very well.

If you like traditional Barolo, then even the small vintages from Borgogno are something for you.

Domenico Clerico 1996 Barolo Ciabot Mentin Ginestra and 2010 Barolo Ciabot Mentin. The 2010 is also from the Ginestra vineyard although it is not mentioned on the label anymore.

Two great red wines saved the long evening, Paolo Scavino 1995 Barolo Rocche dell‘Annunziata and Occidental 2016 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir Cuvée Elizabeth.

The white wines are from California, Rhone and Mosel. We brought the Nebbiolos back from our Piedmont short trip.

We taste two sensational old wines from Piedmont and Burgundy, Marchesi di Barolo 1949 Barolo Gia Opera Pia Riserva and Vandermeulen 1955 Clos de Tart.

This time Tuscany and Piedmont face each other.

This time we have Pinot Noir, Barolo and Portwine.

Three great wines for dinner in ascending order.

Which wine goes best with a nice venison roast? Barolo, Californian Pinot Noir or a Chateauneuf-du-Pape?

Last year in October we were in Piedmont and were able to taste several Barolo from the 2016 vintage. There has never been a Barolo vintage with such fine tannins and which is so fun to drink when young.

When the Barolo 2010 was released you could notice the high quality but it was clear that these wines needed maturity. Now they start to open up. You don't need one of the big names which are very expensive. Also the lesser-known producers have produced great wines.

Barolo has a long shelf life, especially if it is from Marchesi di Barolo or Giacomo Borgogno. You don't need to have a great vintage for a lot of fun.

Here we have two great red wines from La Spinetta and Gaja and a Beckstoffer To-Kalon.

Keller 2007 Hubacker Riesling Großes Gewächs and two fine Nebbiolo from Elio Grasso and La Spinetta were tasted this time.

It is a strange combination - Barolo Riserva and Pinot Noir from California.

This was a lot of fun with Piedmont.

One sparkling and several white wines started a phantastic evening: a 100% Pinot Meunier Champagne, Burgundies from Meursault and Puligny-Montrachet and a great white from Piedmont of the Timorasso grape.

This very rare bottle was bought by a friend and donated at a dinner. Thanks! It seems that in former times Barolo Chinato was also produced by Giacomo Conterno, but today not anymore.

Dogliani was formerly known as Dolcetto di Dogliani. But many people though that it is a sweet wine. So the name was changed. Now it is time to taste 3 of the best Dogliani.

This time we really had mixed stuff: A perfect White Bordeaux from California, a great Barolo 60 years old and a new cuvee from Würtemberg.

Giacomo Borgogno 1952 Barolo Riserva and Gaja 1988 Barbaresco showed again the quality of the Nebbiolo grape.

We don't want to spent the money for a Monfortino and with Cascina Francia there is an alternative from Giacomo Conterno which is similar in quality but different in style with more fruit and freshness.